Schingle's Blog

August 9, 2017

JT Rankings #7

Filed under: Folk tales and songs — Tags: , , , , , , , , — schingle @ 1:32 pm

#7 Stand Up

 

In 1969, JT would put out their second album and expand on their ever growing fan base.  It was their second disc with their second different lineup (granted, with only one change, new guitarist Martin Barre replacing Mick Abrahams), and a symptom of things to come as Tull had an ever evolving lineup.  The other three members from the debut album (1968’s “This Was”) remained the same (for now) with Ian Anderson playing flute, acoustic guitar and acting as front man, Clive Bunker on drums and Glenn Cornick playing bass.  A very high percentage of the songs on this disc remained regular parts of the group’s nightly live sets.  “Fat Man” has a humorous set of lyrics and some pretty impressive mandolin work; “A New Day Yesterday” was a stalwart in their concert sets, with a decidedly bluesy feel sounding like an outtake from “This Was” from the year previous; “Nothing Is Easy” was very jazz oriented and was heard in many of their live sets for years to come and, of course, “Bouree” is a jazzified version of the classic from Johann Sebastian Bach that everybody knows, whether or not they know it by name. The bluesy sound is reminiscent of the band’s debut, but this one has a lot more of a jazz feel with enough rocking material to make the crowds happy.  Though not released on the album, the band released the single, “Living in the Past” to coincide with the album and the song became an honest to goodness hit for the group.  Yes, some of the material was raw—make no mistake, but “Stand Up” was an album that allowed Tull to just begin to make a name for themselves and propelled them into better than four decades of making great music.  If you’ve never heard it—go on, give it a try.  You’ll have no regrets.

 

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