Schingle's Blog

August 6, 2017

JT Rankings #9

Filed under: Folk tales and songs — Tags: , , , , , , , , — schingle @ 2:38 pm

#9  The Broadsword and the Beast

1982 brought the album, “The Broadsword and the Beast” which was a great response to 1980’s “A.”  This one had more of a folky feel, though not to the degree of the final three albums that finished the 1970’s for the group.  This would be the second album in a row with the core squad of Ian Anderson (flute, acoustic guitar, vocals), Martin Barre (Lead electric guitar and some acoustic guitar) and Dave Pegg (Bass, background vocals).  The personnel are rounded out with Peter-John Vetese (Keyboards, vocals, who would bounce in and out of the band for the rest of the ‘80’s) and Gerry Conway (Drums, who later appeared on the “Crest of a Knave” LP).  Now, this is another one that may not have a particularly memorable individual song, but listening to the album from cover to cover is just a delightful experience.  Interestingly, the last song on the disc (“Cheerio”) became the final encore for most of the rest of their touring years.  It’s a very short song with basically two lines (the final of which goes: “I’ll pour a cup to you my darling, raise it up, say cheerio”).  There are two title songs, making each side (remember LP’s?) have a title.  “Beastie” heads side one while “Broadsword” leads off side two.  “Watching Me, Watching You” is a humorous one about a guy who’s just plain paranoid and “Fallen on Hard Times,” lamenting the recession of the early ‘80’s actually got a little airplay on more progressive, album oriented rock stations.  More than anything, this was a great comeback album from the less than thrilling “A” (1980).  If one doesn’t mind listening to music that isn’t exactly “hit” oriented, this is a beautiful album from beginning to end.

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