Schingle's Blog

July 30, 2017

JT Rankings #13

Filed under: Folk tales and songs — Tags: , , , , , , , , — schingle @ 3:57 pm

#13  Stormwatch

The band’s most prolific and, arguably, best decade of music ended with 1979’s “Stormwatch.”  This was the third album in a row which had a distinctly folky feel (though there were a few more rockers than on the two predecessors, 1977’s “Songs From the Wood” and “Heavy Horses” from 1978).  This was the fourth, and unfortunately last, album in a row with, essentially, the same lineup.  Four in a row with the same members tied a record for the group.  The studio album featured Ian Anderson (Front man, flute, acoustic guitar and bass on most of the album), Martin Barre (Lead guitar), John Evan and David Palmer (Keyboards), Barrie Barlow (Drums) and John Glascock (Bass on a few songs, as he had been quite sick by this time).  Glascock was replaced by Dave Pegg on the ensuing tour and Pegg became the core bassist for the next 15 plus years, due to Glascock’s untimely passing at the tender age of 28.  Though this collection does not have a particularly memorable song that would get airplay, the album, as a whole, is a great listen from beginning to end.  Perhaps it is for this reason that the supporting tour basically opened with the entire album with a huge finale, then followed by a sort of greatest hits making a standard hour and a half long set.  Though this would never be considered a “concept album” the songs certainly have a particular feel and seem to deal with the human population’s dependence on crude oil.  This is most notable in the opener, “North Sea Oil.”  The opener to side two, “Something’s on the Move,” is quite a rocker and “Dun Ringill” (Which is as close to the “title” song as the album has) is a pretty one with almost a chill to it.  Regardless of the songs, and order, “Stormwatch” is certainly a must own for hard core Tull fans, and for novices, it’s not a bad one to listen to, to get a feel for the band as a whole.

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